CV -RESUME WORKSHOP
also see PORTFOLIO and NEW TRENDS IN CVs

This is a short guideline which will help you write your CV (CVs are often called resumes in American English)
Remember : each CV is unique and should be slightly modified or adapted to the job you are applying for.

STEP ONE
 choose a title or objective for your CV or resume
the title should briefly say who you are and what you're looking for (for details click here)
example : Objective : to seek internship position in materials science

STEP TWO
 personal information
write your name, student's address and permanent address, email, phone, fax ( no mention of age, sex or marital status for a US resume) (for details click here)
write some keywords (keywords are an easy way for employers to identify your areas of expertise, especially if you post your resume on the internet)
examples : computer engineering, matlab, decision tools (for details click here)

STEP THREE
 education
explain your academic background in reversed chronological order (for details click here )

STEP FOUR
professional experience
give a detailed account of ALL your professional experience, including student's jobs, au-pair, private tuition, volunteering jobs and of course engineering internships (for details click here )

TITLE OR OBJECTIVE
It atracks the reader's eyes immediately and shows who you are and what you are looking for.
It should be typed in bold letters in the center of the page.
here are 3 examples with 3 different sentence structure :
Environmental management M.S, looking for environmental specialist position
Objective : to obtain an entry-level position in mechanical engineering
Seeking advancement in financial mathematics

PERSONAL INFORMATION
CVs in the US are called resumes or biosketches .
For an American CV, don't mention age, race, sex, national origin, avoid photographs.
US citizens are protected by the Equal Employment Opportunity laws which mean that your sex, race, age and religion should not prevent you from being hired.
For information on Equal Employment Opportunity laws see : http://www.law.cornell.edu/topics/employment_discrimination.html
 

KEYWORDS
Keywords are an easy way for employers to spot your CV on the internet through search engines.
Don't put too many and don't put very large keywords such as "engineering".
Highlight your skills.
For example, an environmental engineer might include the keywords : "toxic waste, water-networks, field experience, modelling etc…"

EDUCATION
This is certainly the most delicate part for a French student, especially a student from a "grande école".
Follow the recommendations that you will find on Traduction termes français pour CV .
Many American or British students highlight their skills by listing a list of courses which corresponds to the job they're applying for.
For example :
A student from the Ecole des Mines looking for a position in computer engineering should list his or her computer courses and ignore other courses like materials science which could confuse the reader .
The same student looking for a position in management or economics should emphasize his/her courses in this field.
This means that because your background is very brooadly based you should write an adapted CV for every job you will be applying for.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
Include everything you did which could be considered as a job or responsibility : part-time summer jobs, volunteer work, tuition for school kids, camp guide, baby-sitter.
Ex : organized volley-ball club, taught maths to 16 year old student for a year.
If you have worked in industrial companies :
give the name and address of the company : ex : Usinor at Ugines (Savoie, France)
 briefly explain what the company does : ex : steel production plant
 describe what you did during your placement , and use VERBS IN THE PRETERIT: ex : developed business applications software using C and C++, created and tested all code and set up procedures for alpha and beta tests of product (for more verbs click here)



Liliane Bois-Simon
Office of International Relations
Associate Director
bsimon@emse.fr
                                                                                 Tous droits réservés / All rights reserved
                                                                                            Updated September 2002