Powerpoint Nights
                        by the Wobbling Bear


Once upon a Time ...

One guy named Abouldinar Ben Malaki was the Emir of the city of Basrah.

Well you know an Emir is a kind of King ;
though he mainly reported to the great Caliph in Baghdad, Abouldinar
was running the city with no interference from above (except God).

This he did quite well: the inhabitants of Basrah were thankfull that not everybody was allowed
to kill, loot or rape!

For a man of this importance the Emir had relatively few wives. This not only because he wanted to be
in accordance with the holy Quran but also because he became Emir after fighting the 77 male scions
of his late father! As a benevolent man he wanted to avoid  the pains of  his own succession for his city
and its inhabitants.

But his staying relatively wife poor  was a problem with the many tribes of his constituency. Tradionally
each tribe sent a girl to the bed of the ruling Emir to settle matters for her brothers and cousins.
So Abouldinar  set up an elegant and practical solution: as every now and then a tribe will send
a bride, after some time, she would accidentally and unfortunately die.

So now it was the turn of the tribe of the Ouled Tameer and so they chose a really worthy bride.
Her name was Razade and she was beautiful. Her skin was white (an advantage of being brought
under veils  and stuck to the inside of the house) and she was wonderfully plump
(in those times they appreciated women with generous  shapes: since fast-food outlets did not exist
at that time they used delicacies such as  Hoomoos and honey pastries).
Another advantage for the tribe in this case was the removal  of a pest (by which they meant an educated woman
<the author bears no responsability to the unpolitical correctness of historical figures>)

Months after Razade entered the palace she was still in charge and the other tribes were
beginning to feel uneasy. One tribe, the Beni Swatil, was particularly jumpy:
it should have been their turn to have access to the Emir largesses.
So they decided to send a spy inside the palace.

Snoopy Ali was designated and, cleverly, he decided to pass as an eunuch
(-still wondering how he managed to do that-).

And then one evening he managed to have access to the Emir's bedroom.
What he saw infused awe!

Razade was using a powerful magic contraption named PowerPoint to tell a bedtime story to the Emir
and things went like that:

"So tonight we are going to review SindBad's voyage number 3:
    - why SindBad sailed to sea
    - how he landed to the island of Sonacotra
    - where he met the terrible giant Al Atrous
    - how he dispose of the monster via a potent urticant powder
    - back to Basrah rich and famous
"

Now she changed the slide:

"Upon completion of this module you will be able to:
    - recognise  the six different sorts of ships
    - describe how a ship floats
    - understand how a sailor can use stars to navagate
"
this was accompanied by fancy illustrations of "ant people" doing outrageous things and even video clips where you could see an ethnically mixed bunch of joyous and willing people manning oars in a galley!

Before falling asleep himself Snoopy Ali realised that the Emir was already snoring like crazy!
In the morning he realised had not dreamed. Even worse he seemed to lack any imagination.
Indeed, to his horror Ali came to understand that Razade's potent magic induced
a sleep without dreams. This was very bad news.

From now on governement of Basrah went from bad to worse for there is no worse fate
that being cursed with a government without dreams!

This curse  went on for centuries and now if you go to Basrah and stand in the middle of the street
and shout " I am a CompTIA CTT+ certified trainer!" you are absolutely sure to get a volley of bullets
from AK47s
(only slightly nastier than PowerPoint bullets!)

The end ;-)

Ce texte © 2005-2006 The Wobbling Bear- tous droits réservés


Ps if you like this tale perhaps you will like these sites as well:

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